The Best Coffee Beans

The Best Coffee Beans in the World: A Mystery Worthy of Sherlock Holmes

From the state of Peru, located in the South American west, all the way to Papua New Guinea — like a belt, the realm of coffee girds the entire globe. Recently, even China and other countries with tea traditions reaching far into antiquity have successfully entered the coffee world and started competing for the title of the best coffee beans with other coffee growers. It’s estimated that at the moment, close to 17 million coffee farmers are involved in the coffee business, growing coffee in more than 60 countries. On one hand, coffee lovers rejoice in such a wide selection and make use of the opportunity to experience various flavours, but on the other, they face a serious challenge when it comes to choosing the best coffee beans available.

“Hello. Can I buy the best coffee beans from you?” No coffee house — even if it’s the best one — will be able to answer this question for you. This is because, as sad as this might sound, there’s simply no such thing as “the best coffee beans”. Sure, the quality of all coffee beans can be evaluated from a technical viewpoint, but the most important factor ultimately prevails — and that’s none other than the individual preference of each coffee drinker.

So, what can coffee lovers do when searching for the best beans? In order to find the beans that are best for you, we recommend learning the keywords of the coffee realm, so that you can accurately scan the information provided on the packaging of coffee. We’ll discuss these 8 crucial keywords below. 

Two Key Questions

If the legendary detective Sherlock Holmes went looking for the best coffee beans in the world, he’d undoubtedly start his search in coffee farms: the detective would analyse the soil surrounding coffee trees, calculate the altitude and pressure, observe the work of coffee farmers… After all, before coffee beans, beautifully packaged and perfectly roasted, reach the shelves of shops and e-shops, they must be… grown. When we look at brown, roasted beans, we often forget that a coffee bean is, in fact, a reddish, sometimes yellow, pit of a sweet coffee cherry. Even the pulp of this cherry, which is removed during processing, has an impact on the final taste of the best coffee beans. 

Are you looking for the best coffee beans because you’re convinced that they’ll allow you to enjoy the smoothest possible coffee? Such thinking may be false: even if somebody labeled certain coffee beans as the best, these beans wouldn’t necessarily suit your personal taste. Start your search for the perfect coffee beans by answering a couple of questions. First, which coffee brewing method do you use? Do you have a coffee machine, use a special filter or simply pour water over ground coffee? Secondly, what kind of flavours do you want to feel in the cup? 

The first keyword is coffee blend and single-origin

coffee blend and single-origin

If you want to feel like a professional coffee taster, choose light-roasted single-origin beans (we’ll discuss them in more detail later on) characterised by fruity, flowery flavours. The uniqueness of single-origin coffee beans lies in the fact that coffee made from them needs no additional ingredients — its flavours are rich enough by themselves. In other words, the taste of such coffee shouldn’t be changed with milk or sugar. However, even this isn’t set in stone! For example, if you use single-origin coffee beans with vivid notes of strawberries in them, adding some milk to your espresso might result in a drink that reminds you of summer and strawberry milkshakes.

If, on the contrary, you enjoy the rich taste of “proper” coffee, pick coffee beans or coffee blends of a darker roast: they taste of chocolate and nuts, are heavy-bodied and extremely flavourful.  

Note. By combining beans from different countries or regions, coffee bean blends can produce a truly unique flavour that ticks all of your boxes. Such blends use coffee beans that complement each other or make the overall taste more intense. To put it simply, what hasn’t been done by nature can be achieved by people, who combine and balance the flavours of different beans.  

Searching for the Best Coffee Beans on the Map

Those who want to set off on a journey across the realm of coffee should remember that “country of origin” is one of the most important keywords on this path. After all, it’s this magic term that allows us to travel the whole world and experience its flavours from the comfort of our own home! People started talking about the traceability of coffee beans a few decades ago, when the so-called third wave, related to the term of specialty coffee, started. 

It must be mentioned that the country of origin may not be provided on the packaging of some coffee varieties — especially if the packaging contains a coffee blend — but more and more importance is being placed on identifying this factor. In fact, if we’re talking about specialty coffee beans, it’s considered a necessity! By the way, if the coffee is labeled as “specialty”, its packaging identifies not only the country of origin, but also a certain region and farmer who produced the coffee. Does this sound complicated? Coffee connoisseurs went even further. On some packaging, you can find the word “microlot”, which means that these carefully selected beans of the highest quality originated from a very small coffee farm or a certain narrow plot of the farm’s land.

The second keyword is coffee regions

Coffee regions

All coffee-producing countries can be divided into four regions: South America, Central America, Africa and Asia. If we had to describe the coffee of each of these regions with just a few words, these are the descriptions we’d choose: 

  • South American coffee it tends to be lighter and its taste is milder, notes of dark chocolate and nuts can be felt. It’s also less acidic than African coffee.
  • Central American coffee – its flavour is vivid and less sweet compared to the South American region, tasting notes vary from fruit to nuts. 
  • African coffee – flavours of fruit, berries and flowers dominate in this coffee. It’s also more acidic and its taste is often compared to that of wine. 
  • Asian coffee – it’s renowned for its bitterness and earthy flavours. The biggest exporters include Vietnam, India and Indonesia. The latter is where Kopi Luwak, probably the most expensive coffee in the whole world, is produced. We tasted it ourselves and reported our impressions — you can find them in the tasting section!

Note. Nevertheless, when narrowing down the amazing variety of coffee flavours to a few regions, we can’t expect to reach any sort of accuracy. As a result, if anybody tries to convince you that certain coffee is definitely high-quality just because it originated from Ethiopia, Brazil or any other coffee-growing country, keep in mind that this isn’t necessarily true. When exploring flavours, it’s important to consider other factors besides the country of origin, the region and even the coffee farm (remember “microlot” coffee?) in which the beans have been grown. Take, for example, two Asian states. Coffee grown in Indonesia is characterised by a full body, deep, earthy flavours and low acidity. However, in Papua New Guinea, coffee trees grow on volcanic soil, which provides coffee with a sweeter, clean taste and acidity akin to that of citrus fruit. Only by tasting various drinks and finding out which coffee beans have been used to prepare the coffee can you choose the best beans for you. 

Growing the Best Coffee Beans Takes Time 

From the very start, i.e. while your future coffee is still growing, its flavour is impacted by various natural factors. These factors include, first and foremost, the soil used to grow coffee and the natural conditions surrounding it. The taste of coffee beans grown on the same soil can differ depending on, for example, the annual rainfall. In our opinion, however, the most important factor of the coffee growing process is the way in which coffee farmers tend to, pick and process coffee cherries. If high quality isn’t ensured during these stages, you can forget all about the best coffee beans, even if they’ve been surrounded by perfect conditions. The simplest example to give would be this: ripe coffee cherries are usually picked by hand, so the pickers themselves must decide if they’re going to pick only the best, fully ripened cherries. 

The third keyword is altitude

Altitude

On the packaging of some coffee beans, buyers can find the natural factor of altitude at which the coffee trees have been grown. 600 metres. 1200 metres. 1500 metres. 2000 metres and more. This is more than just statistics. The higher the coffee trees grow, the more complicated conditions the coffee cherries must endure. At higher altitudes, coffee cherries ripen more slowly and they’re impacted by higher pressure. Having compared coffee beans grown at higher and lower altitudes, scientists have discovered that beans grown at higher altitudes are characterised by better body, i.e. the mouthfeel of the coffee (thick or light), as well as aroma. 

Note. The biggest fan of high altitudes is the arabica variety. It’s generally stated that arabica coffee trees grow at an altitude of at least 600 metres, but as far as their taste is concerned, the higher the altitude at which the coffee beans have been grown, the higher their quality. This is why you should always pay attention to the altitude identified on the packaging of your chosen coffee. 

If You’re Searching for the Best Coffee Beans, Start With Arabica

Arabica, Robusta, Liberica

More often than not, you’ll encounter the word “arabica” on the packaging of coffee beans. Beans of this type represent the world’s most widespread coffee variety, which makes up as much as three fourths of the entire quantity of coffee sold around the globe. The remaining one fourth of consumed coffee is taken up by the robusta variety. The liberica species, which makes up only one percent and is generally used to produce instant coffee, nestles between the arabica and robusta. What should you know? There are numerous other coffee tree species in wild nature, but these are the only three that are grown on a massive scale and are used for commercial purposes. By the way, arabica, robusta and liberica all originated from Africa. It was only later on that they spread across other countries and took root in places with suitable natural conditions. 

The arabica variety is the most demanding of all, but what makes it unique is a wide range of flavours formed by the surrounding natural conditions, as well as the aroma and sweetness of these beans. As a result, the words “100% arabica beans” often function as a mark of quality. Unfortunately, these words, when used all by themselves, don’t have much meaning. First of all, the buyer doesn’t know where the arabica comes from: is it South America, Africa or perhaps Asia? You should stay vigilant because of other reasons as well — we’ve already mentioned that in addition to the variety of coffee beans, their processing, roasting and other factors, which can dramatically change and, of course, ruin the taste of arabica, are also important. By the way, the words “100% robusta” are encountered extremely rarely, as robusta beans are generally used in blends and combined with the arabica species. Italians are great fans of robusta. If these beans are included in the list of ingredients, a coffee drinker can assume that such coffee will be heavy-bodied, thick and more bitter. It’ll also contain a larger quantity of caffeine. 

The fourth keyword is coffee bean species and subspecies

If you think it’s that simple, we have to let you down — or perhaps cheer you up. The arabica species is further divided into dozens of subspecies, which developed through natural mutation of coffee trees or deliberate crossing of different coffee plants performed by humans. So what should you do if, instead of arabica, you encounter other beans that are less familiar to you? Let’s try and find out more about some of them: 

  • Arabica Typica: this coffee is the forebear of all other coffee species. It’s been grown and refined for centuries. Its taste is exceptionally sweet and clean. 
  • Bourbon: it contains notes of fruit and sweet caramel. It’s generally stated that this coffee variety can enchant both true coffee connoisseurs and complete novices that have just started exploring the world of coffee. Give it a try and see for yourselves! 
  • Catimor: it’s characterised by aromas of nuts and herbs, while notes of cherries and other berries can be detected in the prepared drink. Subtle hints of acidity and sweetness, as well as a heavy body, are also experienced by its drinkers. 
  • Catuai: it’s mildly acidic and exceptionally sweet — notes of caramel and honey can be felt. However, the taste of these beans depends on their country of origin and the natural conditions surrounding the coffee trees.
  • Caturra: the prepared coffee has a vivid citrusy taste and a light body. 
  • Geisha: this coffee is smooth as silk, subtle and characterised by a variety of different flavours. Its body is heavy, reminiscent of black tea, hints of bergamot bark can be detected. By the way, no coffee beans in the world have more awards than these ones! 
  • Heirloom: this is a generic name used to describe coffee beans grown in Ethiopia. It’s calculated that there are between six and ten thousand coffee species in Ethiopia — all of them undergo the process of natural crossing in wild nature, creating new species as a result. The term “heirloom” refers to this process. Coffee beans grown in different Ethiopian villages or farms can all be called “heirloom”, even though each of the farms produces beans that are characterised by completely unique features of flavour. Give this mysterious Ethiopian coffee a try — we’ve included it in our tasting list as well!
  • Icatu: vivid flavours of plums, chocolate and berries dominate in these dry-processed beans. 
  • Jamaican Blue Mountain: these beans are characterised by mild acidity, as well as a light and balanced taste. They’re generally thought to be one of the best coffee beans in the world!
  • Maracatu: what makes these beans unique is their vivid, fruity acidity. In terms of flavour, they’re nestled somewhere between the subspecies of Caturra and Maragogype.
  • Maragogype: this coffee is characterised by a fruity, long-lasting taste and acidity of citrus fruit. The size of these beans makes them stand out from the crowd — they’re also referred to as elephant beans
  • Mundo Novo: the sweet taste, heavy body and subtle acidity of these beans are all truly enchanting. 
  • Pacamara: these coffee beans are grown in El Salvador and are characterised by balanced flavours of flowers and citrus fruit, as well as mild acidity and sweetness. 
  • Pacas: these beans entice coffee drinkers with the help of sweet and subtly acidic flavours, as well as hints of spices and flowers. 
  • SL-34/SL-38: these beans come from Kenya and are also called blueberry bombs. They’re characterised by a long-lasting taste of fruity wine.
  • Timor or Tim Tim: like most Indonesian coffee bean varieties, they’re characterised by an earthy flavour of herbs and a long-lasting aftertaste. 
  • Villa Sarchi: this coffee is characterised by delicate acidity, intense fruit-flavoured notes and wonderful sweetness.

Note. Some coffee bean species spread across the whole world, while others can only grow within the bounds of a certain country. This is all due to mutations. If you make sure to remember the name of the beans used in coffee that you enjoy drinking, you’ll be one step closer to finding the best beans for you.   

Beans Have Seen the Light of Day — Now How Do We Avoid Ruining Them? 

It takes around nine months for a coffee tree to ripen its cherries, but, as we’ve already mentioned, not all cherries ripen at the same time. As a result, the process of harvesting is always dynamic. 

The fifth keyword is processing method

Coffee processing method

When processing ripe cherries, two main methods are generally used, but as coffee culture keeps on developing, farmers are looking for new techniques that would help them offer the best coffee beans to the buyers. The oldest technique used to extract coffee beans from the pulp of the cherry is leaving them out in the sun to dry. This processing method is called natural, or dry.  Ripe, carefully sorted cherries are spilt onto concrete pavement or special beds, which are called African or coffee beds. These cherries must be turned over again and again, so that they dry out evenly and aren’t beset by mould. Once the cherries are dry, they’re cleaned and separated from the pits. What kind of dangers do the best coffee beans face during this stage? If coffee cherries are overdried, they become brittle and lots of beans crack during pit removal. Such beans are called defective. On the other hand, if too much water stays in the cherries, they might simply grow mouldy later on. The best coffee beans are characterised by 12.5% humidity. No more, no less. Coffee beans processed with the help of the dry method usually acquire some fruity sweetness. 

African or coffee beds

The second method of coffee processing is called wet processing and beans processed in this way are referred to as washed. Cherries are first poured into a water tank — ripe cherries are heavier, so they sink to the bottom, while green cherries simply float on the surface. Afterwards, the pulp of ripe cherries is removed with the help of a special machine. Finally, beans are immersed in a different water container and allowed to ferment. This process must be  monitored carefully, so that the flavour of beans doesn’t undergo any radical changes. Once this stage is over, coffee beans are washed one more time and then dried. Beans processed with the help of the wet method are more acidic than the ones produced by dry processing. 

Wet processing

One of the newest processing methods is the so-called honey process. It has nothing to do with honey produced by bees though. Compared to the wet method, beans stay in the water for a shorter period of time during this process, so fermentation is achieved more quickly. At the same time, fewer sugars contained in the bean are turned to acid. As a result, coffee beans processed in this way are perfect for those who enjoy intense sweetness. Another processing method, which is encountered even more rarely, is the experimental anaerobic process, which deprives coffee of oxygen during fermentation, allowing it to “stew in its own juices”. The result of such processing is an intense fruity taste, although coffee processed anaerobically can acquire a variety of flavours, depending on the added ingredients. When choosing anaerobically processed beans, pay attention to the flavours listed on the packaging and allow your own taste buds to guide you!

Honey processing method

Coffee-producing countries want to stand out from the crowd, so they’re constantly on the lookout for unique ways of processing their coffee beans. One of such processing methods is Giling Basah. It’s practised in Indonesia. Following fermentation and washing of beans, they aren’t dried fully instead, beans that are still wet (with 2530% humidity) enter a special hulling machine. Only then the drying process is allowed to continue. If you want to experience the flavour of beans processed in this way, try coffee beans grown in Sumatra (Indonesia). Before you do that, however, you can read our impressions in the tasting section!

Giling Basah processing method

There are some coffee bean processing methods that are even more exotic than the ones discussed above. The Indonesian forests are populated by Asian palm civets, whose favourite delicacies are sweet cherries growing on coffee trees. These animals are expert at picking out only the ripest berries. The pulp of these cherries is subsequently digested, while the pit is eliminated through the gastrointestinal tract. While the pit isn’t digested, the enzymes found in the stomachs of palm civets still have an impact on it.  By the way, the final taste of such coffee is also affected by other food that the animal has recently eaten. Most interestingly, this is how the world’s most expensive coffee is born — it’s known as Kopi Luwak. We’ve tasted it ourselves and reported our tasting experiences!

Kopi Luwak

Note. Coffee bean processing methods are human solutions based on the possibilities of raw materials created by nature. As technologies progress, new ways of processing coffee beans, which are geared towards purifying and refining the unique taste of coffee, are added to the list of traditional processing methods. In our case, it’s important to know the differences between the main processing methods, but it’s just as crucial to keep an open mind and not be afraid to try beans processed with the help of various techniques. 

It’s Time for the Beans to Reveal Their Flavour

The preparation of green coffee beans makes up only a small part of the whole journey. Turning hard pits into aromatic coffee beans is just as important, and this is precisely what coffee roasters do. This stage is where true magic really begins!

The sixth keyword is coffee roasting

Coffee roasting

Before roasting, green coffee pits have absolutely no features of flavour characterising the familiar taste of coffee. Over the course of roasting, however, these pits are turned into brown beans. The aroma of fresh coffee is definitely impressive, so when searching for the best coffee, pay attention to the numbers indicating the roasting date. Sure, this date isn’t always provided, but it’s extremely important. The aroma of beans roasted a week ago, a month ago, three months ago differs significantly — as time goes on, it gets progressively weaker. 

Another important factor related to roasting is roast level. More often than not, coffee beans of a darker and longer roast are used in espresso machines, while beans of a lighter and shorter roast are best suited for drip coffee makers. When roasting the beans, it’s important to maintain balance and avoid burning them — if beans are burned, you’ll feel a charred taste in your cup. On the other hand, various defects of taste can be hidden by over-roasting the beans, but in such a case, all discussions of flavour fly out the window. Trust us, when we’re talking about roasting, even a single minute becomes a meaningful unit of measurement. 

If the coffee packaging indicates that the roast level is light, you can expect that the prepared coffee will be characterised by a fragrant, refreshing, airy and fruity aroma, as well as a milk-chocolate colour. Medium-roasted coffee beans are supposed to have the largest number of sweet tasting notes, which are complemented by fruity and bitter hints. On the other hand, dark-roasted (but not burnt!) coffee beans will remind you of dark chocolate, spices, wood and smoke. 

Coffee Flavour Wheel

Coffee Flavour Wheel

When choosing the best coffee beans, the most important aspect is, of course, taste. However, we all know that taste is subjective. Only the tasting of coffee will allow you to fully assess the features of its flavour, but coffee roasters and sellers can help you by identifying the available directions. A few decades ago, a special wheel of coffee flavours was created. Thanks to this wheel, we can now learn how to communicate using a common language of coffee. For example, do you feel fruitiness when drinking coffee made from Ethiopian beans? Then find this word in the centre of the wheel and keep moving forward by trying to identify whether this fruitiness reminds you of berries, dried fruit, citrus fruit, etc. If you feel a citrusy taste, you can go even further: does it remind you of grapefruit, oranges, lemons or lime? 

The seventh keyword is assessment of tasting notes

Assessment of tasting notes

How would you describe the flavour of coffee you drank this morning? Was it bitter? Acidic? Or perhaps simply “coffeish”? The descriptions provided on the coffee wheel expand these boundaries considerably and allow you to know what to expect when buying coffee. You have to agree that if the words “blueberries” or “forest berries” appear on the packaging, you tend to feel a hint of mild acidity in your mouth without even tasting the coffee! Similarly, words like “dark chocolate” and “nuts” allow you to remember what it feels like to have a melting piece of dark chocolate on your tongue. 

Another aspect must also be mentioned: it’s possible that you won’t be able to feel the flavours identified on the packaging as vividly when drinking the coffee. This isn’t unexpected and it’s certainly not a bad sign. Taste is a very personal thing, related as it is to our experiences, memories and associations that form an indivisible part of this game of flavours. We’ll give you a simple example. “Notes of buttered toast.” What would these words mean to a person who has never tried a buttered toast? As a result, such flavour descriptions should be perceived as merely orientational, pointing you towards a certain direction but not showing you the road itself. As you keep drinking coffee, you’ll discover the road of flavours that are familiar to you — it might or might not look the same as the one described on the packaging. Over time, your taste buds might even learn to distinguish a wider variety of different tastes! 

Exam for the Best Coffee Beans

The quality of coffee can be assessed with the help of points. This is the challenge that coffee must overcome if it wants to be called specialty coffee, i.e. coffee whose origin can be traced to a certain coffee farm. 

The eighth keyword is coffee quality score

Coffee quality score

Using a 100-point system, certified experts from the Specialty Coffee Association (SCA) evaluate the appearance of unroasted coffee beans before moving on to the features of coffee taste and aroma. Only coffee that scores more than 80 points can be called “specialty”. 

Is this assessment important for an ordinary coffee drinker? Can a regular coffee lover feel the difference between coffee that scored 84 points and one that scored 86? Although most of us couldn’t identify the difference of a few points reflected in the taste of coffee, these points allow us to educate our palate. Most importantly, they help us in our search for high-quality beans. When you have specialty coffee, which has been evaluated by experts, in your hands, you can be sure that you’re holding a truly exceptional product. All that’s left is discovering coffee that best suits your personal taste. It doesn’t matter how many points the beans scored as long as you genuinely like them. 

You’ve Purchased the Best Coffee Beans — Now How Can You Avoid Ruining Them? 

From the simplest coffee brewing method, which involves pouring hot water over ground coffee, to making coffee with the help of a filter, which requires scales and a special kettle as well — there are lots of ways to prepare coffee and none of them can be called “bad”. However, the truth is that once you’ve purchased high-quality coffee beans, you’ll want to experience their flavour to the full. This is precisely where such “coffee games” come into play every gram of coffee, the quality of water, brewing duration and numerous other factors suddenly become important. A few key rules: first of all, don’t pour boiling water over your coffee. Water temperature should be somewhere between 8595°C. Secondly, the so-called “golden” proportions of coffee and water are 6 grams of coffee per 100 ml of water, or 34 spoonfuls of coffee per one cup with a capacity of 200 ml. These proportions have been approved by the Specialty Coffee Association itself. However, the ratio of coffee to water can vary depending on your personal taste!

Coffee brewing methods

Coffee brewing methods

Bean-to-cup coffee machine: this machine will allow you to prepare espresso and various milk-based coffee drinks! The recommended coffee bean grind is fine (similar to flour). 

Pour-over coffee: strong coffee of intense taste. The recommended coffee bean grind is coarse (similar to bread crumbs). 

Moka pot: it’s used to prepare vivid, intense and extra hot coffee. The recommended coffee bean grind is fine (similar to flour). 

French press: it reveals the natural flavour of coffee and produces a heavy-bodied drink. The recommended coffee bean grind is coarse (similar to bread crumbs). 

“AeroPress” coffee maker: fruity notes are activated in the coffee, the weight of the drink’s body is clearly felt. The recommended coffee bean grind is medium (similar to sugar). 

“Chemex” coffee maker: the cleanliness of the prepared coffee is reminiscent of tea, the drink is not at all bitter and its body is light. The recommended coffee bean grind is medium (similar to sugar). 

Note. It’s best to buy coffee in the form of beans and grind them just before preparation. We recommend purchasing an electric or manual coffee grinder. If you store ground coffee for a longer period of time, oxidation will cause it to slowly lose the features of taste and aroma. Coffee beans ground straight before preparation are sure to make you discover good coffee all over again! 

Find the Best Coffee Beans in the World — Let’s Taste Them Together!

We can talk about coffee all day long, but it’s always better to simply make a cup of coffee and taste it. For this purpose, we picked out 24 different types of coffee. Coffee preparation was entrusted to a bean-to-cup coffee machine and the “Chemex” drip coffee maker, which has been growing in popularity recently. 

We’re tasting coffee prepared in a coffee machine

Automatic coffee machine

We’ll start with the simplest and quickest way of preparing coffee — a bean-to-cup coffee machine! With the help of this appliance, we performed 11 taste tests, which included 6 coffee bean blends, 4 varieties of single-origin coffee beans from Central and South America, as well as one organic coffee bean blend from Africa.

Taste test 1: Coffee beans Cafe Liegeois “Magnifico”

Coffee beans Cafe Liegeois “Magnifico”

  • Country of origin: Colombia  
  • Ingredients: blend
  • Roast level: medium dark / 4
  • Tasting notes: raspberries, chocolate, whiskey 
  • Quantity: 1 kg

This coffee is suited for those who love dark, bitter chocolate and intense flavours. The taste of chocolate cloaks the palate and lasts for a long time after the cup has been finished. The bitterness of dark chocolate is complemented by the berryish acidity of raspberry jam, which is as vivid as the taste of chocolate in this blend. Lovers of whiskey are sure to recognise notes of this drink as well, especially after taking the first sip. Once the drink has cooled, the smell of whiskey can be felt in its aroma. 

Taste test 2: Coffee beans “Caprissimo Belgique” 

Coffee beans “Caprissimo Belgique” 

  • Country of origin: Brazil and Honduras
  • Ingredients: blend; 80% arabica and 20% robusta
  • Roast level: medium light / 2
  • Tasting notes: dark chocolate, caramel 
  • Quantity: 1 kg

What makes this coffee unique is its strong character formed by the bitterness of dark chocolate. The drink is thick, heavy-bodied, suited perfectly for drinking alongside a crispy Belgian waffle with caramel filling or an Italian biscotti with nuts. 

Taste test 3: Coffee beans “Caprissimo Professional” 

Coffee beans “Caprissimo Professional” 

  • Country of origin: South America and India 
  • Ingredients: arabica bean blend 
  • Roast level: medium dark / 4
  • Tasting notes: berries, fruit, cherries 
  • Quantity: 1 kg

“The blend of flavours and, of course, delicious acidity make this coffee particularly enticing. It can easily take the place of your afternoon dessert!”

If you’re a fan of strong, bitter coffee, these beans aren’t likely to be your favourite. However, if you’re looking for delectable acidity in your coffee, you simply must give this bean blend a try. Although the beans are of a darker roast, berryish acidity dominates in the drink’s flavour and sweet notes of ripe fruit can be felt. 

Taste test 4: Coffee beans “Caprissimo Fragrante” 

Coffee beans “Caprissimo Fragrante” 

  • Country of origin: Brazil
  • Ingredients: blend
  • Roast level: medium dark / 4
  • Tasting notes: walnuts, milk chocolate, peanuts
  • Quantity: 1 kg

The flavour of this coffee is extra mild, so lovers of strong coffee will definitely consider it too weak. The beans are of a darker roast, but the prepared drink unveils the sweetness of peanut butter and milk chocolate, as well as the subtle bitterness of walnuts.

Taste test 5: Coffee beans “Caprissimo Espresso”

Coffee beans “Caprissimo Espresso”

  • Country of origin: Brazil and India
  • Ingredients: blend; arabica and robusta
  • Roast level: dark / 5
  • Tasting notes: dark chocolate, nuts, berries 
  • Quantity: 1 kg

The beans have been carefully selected from the most well-known Brazilian and Indian farms. The blend contains both arabica and robusta beans — this lends the drink some bitterness and makes you think of Italy! Arabica and robusta blends are characteristic of the traditional Italian espresso. The biggest and most pleasant surprise in this coffee is the flavour of dark, toasted rye bread crust, which endows your palate with a delightful hint of acidity. 

Taste test 6: Specialty coffee beans “El Salvador Santa Petrona” 

Specialty coffee beans “El Salvador Santa Petrona”

  • Country of origin: El Salvador, the region of Santa Ana
  • Ingredients: Pacamara beans, single-origin
  • SCA score: 86.5
  • Altitude: 1700 m
  • Process: natural
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: marzipan, chocolate, lemon rind
  • Quantity/packaging: 1 kg, convenient zipper

The aroma of this coffee is sure to enthrall coffee drinkers from the very start. It’s delicate, intriguing, pleasant to the nose and reminiscent of marzipan. Once you take a sip, you’re greeted by the mild bitterness and delicate acidity of lemon rind — this balance of flavours is characteristic of coffee beans grown in El Salvador. Beans of the Pacamara variety are rare and have been created by crossing coffee trees of the Pacas and Maragogype species. It’s thought that the best coffee beans of this variety are grown precisely in the area of Santa Ana, El Salvador. Go ahead and enjoy them!

P.S. We prepared this coffee both in a bean-to-cup coffee machine and in the “Chemex” coffee maker. It’s equally delicious when prepared both ways!

Taste test 7: Specialty coffee beans Goat Story “Brazil Toucan” 

Specialty coffee beans Goat Story “Brazil Toucan” 

  • Country of origin: Brazil, Minas Gerais, the region of Cerrado Mineiro
  • Ingredients: Catuai, Caturra, Mundo Novo beans, single-origin
  • SCA score: 83.5
  • Altitude: 1100 m
  • Process: natural
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: dark chocolate, caramel, Brazil nuts 
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

We prepared this coffee both in a coffee machine and in the “Chemex” coffee maker as well. Lovers of traditional coffee flavours will fall in love with this coffee at the very first sip. The taste buds are encircled by the bitterness of dark chocolate, extremely subtle acidity and the delicate sweetness of Brazil nuts. 

Taste test 8: Organic coffee beans “Café Liégeois Kivu” 

Organic coffee beans “Café Liégeois Kivu” 

  • Country of origin: Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Ingredients: organic coffee beans, blend
  • Roast level: medium dark / 4
  • Tasting notes: dried dates, dark chocolate, marzipan 
  • Quantity: 250 g

Coffee beans that haven’t been ground yet are extremely aromatic, the sweet smell of cocoa pleasantly tickles the nose. The prepared coffee is especially thick, soft and delicate — the bitterness of dark chocolate follows after the first hint of acidity. Like most African coffee varieties, this one is suited for the lovers of more acidic drinks. 

Taste test 9: Coffee beans Two Chimps “Canoeing in a Cornish Pasty” 

Coffee beans Two Chimps “Canoeing in a Cornish Pasty” 

  • Country of origin: Colombia, the region of Monte Bonito
  • Ingredients: Castillo, Colombia, Caturra beans, single-origin
  • Altitude: 1700 m
  • Process: wet
  • Roast level: medium dark / 4
  • Tasting notes: cane sugar, caramel, oranges 
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

Wow, the texture of this coffee is surprisingly thick! Oozy caramel immediately immerses the taste buds in a sweet marsh of pure pleasure. This isn’t all though — you’ll encounter the delicate acidity of oranges in the drink as well. In other words, what you’ll get is a cup of luxurious coffee accentuated with flavours of citrus fruit. 

Taste test 10: Coffee beans Carringtons Coffee Co. “Brazil Yellow Bourbon Espresso” 

Coffee beans Carringtons Coffee Co. “Brazil Yellow Bourbon Espresso” 

  • Country of origin: Brazil, the region of Mantiqueira
  • Ingredients: Yellow Bourbon beans, single-origin
  • Altitude: 8001350 m
  • Process: natural
  • Roast level: medium dark / 4
  • Tasting notes: hazelnuts, vanilla
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

Brazilian coffee can’t be confused with anything else. When these dark-roasted coffee beans are ground, hints of hazelnuts and vanilla are unveiled in them. This dark, delicious drink is characterised by a heavy body and bitter sweetness.  

Taste test 11: Coffee beans SORoast Coffee “SO: Special Blend” 

Coffee beans SORoast Coffee “SO: Special Blend” 

  • Country of origin: Brazil, Colombia, Rwanda, Ethiopia
  • Ingredients: arabica bean blend
  • Roast level: medium dark / 4
  • Tasting notes: citrus fruit, milk chocolate, hazelnuts 
  • Quantity: 1 kg

“Perfect balance of flavours!”

This coffee combines notes of milk chocolate and nuts, which are characteristic of South American coffee varieties, with acidity that is encountered in African coffee. These unpretentious beans are suited for those who enjoy various flavours. The pleasant, delicate taste and the perfect balance of bitterness and acidity are sure to please everyone.  

We’re tasting coffee prepared in the the “Chemex” drip coffee maker

Chemex drip coffee maker

When preparing coffee in the “Chemex” coffee maker, we followed the so-called “golden” proportions of coffee and water: 60 g of ground coffee per 1 litre of water. Because we used 500 ml of water, the quantity of coffee was consequently adapted to this amount. It goes without saying that we ground coffee beans immediately before preparation and used water with low mineral content. We heated water until it reached the temperature of 94°C, but we made sure not to boil it. 

Central America

About the region. Compared to the region of South America, this vivid coffee is less sweet. Its tasting notes vary from different fruit to nuts.

Taste test 12: Specialty coffee beans “Nicaragua Maragogype” 

Specialty coffee beans “Nicaragua Maragogype”

  • Country of origin: Nicaragua, the region of Matagalpa
  • Ingredients: Maragogype beans
  • SCA score: 83
  • Altitude: 12001500 m
  • Process: wet
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: caramel, honey, spices
  • Quantity/packaging: 1 kg, convenient zipper

“This coffee was probably the most intriguing to my taste buds. Tasting it is like climbing a mountain, with each new step revealing vistas that grow more and more impressive. Once you take the last sip, you feel like you’ve reached the highest peak of flavour.” 

Prepared with the help of the drip method, this coffee greets you with the perfectly balanced combination of delicate sweetness and tender acidity. Don’t be fooled though: this coffee definitely doesn’t belong on the list of the delicate ones! After the tender greeting, you’ll feel spiciness on your palate. Enjoy the buttery softness of these coffee beans unveiled in your cup. 

Taste test 13: Specialty coffee beans “El Salvador Santa Petrona” 

Specialty coffee beans “El Salvador Santa Petrona” 

  • Country of origin: El Salvador, the region of Santa Ana
  • Ingredients: Pacamara beans, single-origin
  • SCA score: 86.5
  • Altitude: 1700 m
  • Process: natural
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: marzipan, chocolate, lemon rind 
  • Quantity/packaging: 1 kg, convenient zipper

“Pay attention to the high SCA score of these beans. If you have any doubts, this number can encourage you to give this coffee a try.”

Seeking to experience the differences of flavour, we prepared these coffee beans both in a coffee machine and in the “Chemex” coffee maker. We’ve already mentioned that the coffee prepared with the help of a machine was absolutely delicious, but the “Chemex” coffee maker further revealed the unique purity of its taste. It’s thought that the best beans of the Pacamara variety are grown precisely in the area of Santa Ana, El Salvador. Because the flavours unveiled in the coffee are characteristic of this country, we recommend giving these beans a try if you want to get to know El Salvador better. 

Taste test 14: Coffee beans Two Chimps “More Coal for the Internet” 

Coffee beans Two Chimps “More Coal for the Internet” 

  • Country of origin: Guatemala, the region of Chimaltenango
  • Ingredients: Catui, Caturra, Typica, Pache beans, single-origin
  • Altitude: 16502200 m
  • Process: wet
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: chocolate, nougat
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

With the very first sip, this coffee will warmly embrace you and you’ll know instantly whether this drink is meant for you. Notes of chocolate biscuits dominate in its flavour, while the first warm hug is accompanied by refreshing sweetness and delicate acidity. A small group of farmers tended to these coffee beans — the cherries were picked by hand. This coffee can’t be confused with anything else! You’ll be dreaming about Guatemala long after enjoying a cup. 

Africa

About the region. African coffee is characterised by fruity, berryish, flowery flavours and exceptionally vivid acidity. In terms of taste, it’s often compared to wine.

Taste test 15: Specialty coffee beans “Ethiopia Shakisso” 

Specialty coffee beans “Ethiopia Shakisso” 

  • Country of origin: Ethiopia, the region of Guji
  • Ingredients: Heirloom beans, single-origin
  • SCA score: 87.5
  • Altitude: 1800 m
  • Process: wet
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: blueberries, blackberries, jasmine
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

“Have a guess: what will coffee made from freshly picked, depulped and immediately roasted beans smell like? That’s right — it’ll smell of jasmine.”

Oh, Ethiopia! It smells of jasmine and pleases your palate with berryish flavours of blueberries and blackberries. This coffee is naturally sweet. The more freshly roasted your Ethiopian coffee is, the more vivid the aroma of flowers gets. 

Taste test 16: Specialty coffee beans “Kenya Kariru”

Specialty coffee beans “Kenya Kariru”

  • Country of origin: Kenya, the region of Kirinyaga
  • Ingredients: SL-34 and SL-28 beans, single-origin
  • SCA score: 87.5
  • Altitude: 18001900 m
  • Process: wet
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: raspberries, redcurrants, apples 
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

“Coffee with a taste that vivid deserves much more than applause — it deserves to be tasted right away.” 

This coffee is filled with the taste of berries! You’ll feel the aroma of redcurrants both after grinding the coffee beans and after preparing the drink. Once you start drinking it, you’ll experience the striking flavour of redcurrants too. It’s like drinking redcurrant compote! The beans were grown on volcanic soil and it definitely had an impact on the unique taste of this coffee. Drinking it feels like eating a ripe apple — a pleasant, sweet aftertaste lingers on your palate long after finishing the cup. 

Taste test 17: Specialty coffee beans Lincoln Coffee House “Uganda Natural” 

Specialty coffee beans Lincoln Coffee House “Uganda Natural” 

  • Country of origin: Uganda, the region of Rwenzori
  • Ingredients: SL-14 and SL-28 beans, single-origin
  • SCA score: 86
  • Altitude: 1720 m
  • Process: natural
  • Roast level: light / 1
  • Tasting notes: cocoa, lychees, cherry pie, pomegranates, strawberries
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

The Rwenzori Mountains, which are located in southwestern Uganda, are also known as “moon mountains”. These coffee beans were grown on the slopes of this mountain range. The volcanic, nitrogen-rich soil creates the perfect conditions for coffee trees to grow. In terms of taste, this coffee is reminiscent of cherry compote with pits! Vivid acidity can be felt in the drink. Like most African coffee varieties, this one is characterised by the flavour of tea. 

Taste test 18: Coffee beans Two Chimps “Oodles of Ongles” 

Coffee beans Two Chimps “Oodles of Ongles”

  • Country of origin: Rwanda, the region of Ibisi
  • Ingredients: Red Bourbon beans, single-origin
  • Altitude: 1700 m
  • Process: natural
  • Roast level: light / 1
  • Tasting notes: rhubarb, grapefruit, spices, toffee candies
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

“As the light, fruity acidity of this coffee turns into the well-known sweetness of toffee candies, you experience a truly unique feeling.”

Light-roasted coffee beans provide this coffee with the feeling of airiness. Like African beans are wont to do, they greet you with delicate, fruity acidity. As the drink cools, the unique sweetness of toffee candies — or simply liquid caramel — is unveiled. It coats your palate each time you take a sip! By the way, the aroma of ground beans is also special — the sweet smell of marzipan tickles the nose. 

Asia

About the region. Asian coffee is renowned for its bitterness and earthy flavours. 

Taste test 19: Specialty coffee beans “Indonesia Sumatra” 

Specialty coffee beans “Indonesia Sumatra”

  • Country of origin: Indonesia, the island of Sumatra 
  • Ingredients: Tim Tim beans, single-origin
  • SCA score: 84
  • Altitude: 14501700 m
  • Process: Giling Basah (following fermentation and washing of beans, they aren’t dried fully instead, beans that are still wet (with 2530% humidity) enter a special hulling machine and only then the drying process is allowed to continue)
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: cinnamon, brown sugar, wine
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

Tim Tim beans were created by crossing arabica and robusta coffee trees, so the flavour of this coffee is similar to other Asian varieties. There’s no berryish acidity in this drink. Your nose will be immediately filled with the rich aroma of brown sugar and cinnamon, while your palate will experience the vivid flavour of red wine. 

Taste test 20: Specialty coffee beans “Papua New Guinea Sigri” 

Specialty coffee beans “Papua New Guinea Sigri” 

  • Country of origin: Papua New Guinea, the Wahgi Valley
  • Ingredients: Caturra beans, single-origin
  • SCA score: 84
  • Altitude: 1600 m
  • Process: wet
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: ginger biscuits, black tea, honey 
  • Quantity/packaging: 1 kg, convenient zipper

“These coffee beans show just how intriguing the world of coffee can be.” 

Lovers of black tea absolutely must give this coffee a try. If you close your eyes, you’ll feel like you’re drinking strong black tea with lemon and honey. The delicate sweetness of honey, as well as lemony acidity, can be felt in the taste of this coffee. 

Taste test 21: Specialty coffee beans Lincoln Coffee House “India Natural” 

Specialty coffee beans Lincoln Coffee House “India Natural” 

  • Country of origin: India, the region of Korg
  • Ingredients: S-795 beans, single-origin
  • SCA score: 86
  • Altitude: 1000 m
  • Process: natural
  • Roast level: light / 1
  • Tasting notes: apricots, chocolate, raspberries, syrup, flowers
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

Welcome to Asia! Coffee beans of the S-795, or Jember, variety are grown all over India and Indonesia. The flavours of maple syrup, caramel and brown sugar are unveiled in the prepared cup. The taste of this coffee will remind you of rich, strong and bitter dark chocolate. Sweet tasting notes please the palate, while the perfect amount of acidity might make you think of juicy apricots. As the drink cools, the aroma of flowers unfolds. 

South America 

About the region. South American coffee is usually lighter, its taste is more delicate, notes of dark chocolate and nuts can be felt. Compared to African coffee beans, these ones are less acidic. 

Taste test 22: Specialty coffee beans Goat Story “Brazil Toucan” 

Specialty coffee beans Goat Story “Brazil Toucan” 

  • Country of origin: Brazil, Minas Gerais, the region of Cerrado Mineiro
  • Ingredients: Catuai, Caturra, Mundo Novo beans, single-origin
  • SCA score: 83.5
  • Altitude: 1100 m
  • Process: natural
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: dark chocolate, caramel, Brazil nuts
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

Fans of traditional coffee flavours are guaranteed to fall in love with this coffee. The taste buds are encircled by the bitterness of dark chocolate, extremely subtle acidity and the delicate sweetness of Brazil nuts. If you prepare this coffee in a drip coffee maker, the taste of nuts will become even more vivid. 

Taste test 23: Specialty coffee beans Goat Story “Colombia La Marianela” 

Specialty coffee beans Goat Story “Colombia La Marianela”

  • Country of origin: Colombia, the region of Cauca
  • Ingredients: Caturra, Catimor beans, single-origin, microlot
  • SCA score: 84
  • Altitude: 16501800 m
  • Process: natural
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: red fruit, rum, cocoa, tropical fruit
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

“As soon as you open the bag, your nose is filled with the unique, pleasant aroma of rum. The fruity sweetness and lightness of this coffee is hard to forget.” 

As soon as you open the bag, you’re greeted by the rich aroma of rum, while ground coffee beans reveal vivid notes of dark chocolate. The taste of this coffee is as rich as its aroma. The prepared drink is reminiscent of unsweetened, freshly squeezed red fruit juice, but the palate is ultimately left with the pleasant sweetness of tropical fruit. It reminded us of passion fruit!

Taste test 24: Specialty coffee beans Carringtons Coffee Co. “Colombia Single Estate” 

Specialty coffee beans Carringtons Coffee Co. “Colombia Single Estate” 

  • Country of origin: Colombia, the region of Antioquia
  • Ingredients: Castillo, Caturra, Colombia beans, single-origin
  • Altitude: 17502050 m
  • Process: wet
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: citrus fruit, oranges, brown sugar
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

“This coffee is as light as a feather and as sweet as a summer meadow filled with the smell of honey. This inimitable aroma reminds me of the blossoms of a homegrown mandarin tree.” 

This coffee is as tender and soft as velvet. Drinking it will allow you to experience the natural sweetness of coffee, which is reminiscent of brown sugar. Once the beans have been ground, the pleasant aroma of citrus fruit is unveiled, while each sip of this coffee leaves a long-lasting aftertaste of oranges in your mouth.

The world’s most expensive beans 

Taste test 25: Specialty coffee beans “Jamaica Blue Mountain” 

Specialty coffee beans “Jamaica Blue Mountain” 

  • Country of origin: Jamaica, Clydesdale, the region of Blue Mountains
  • Ingredients: Blue Mountain beans, single-origin
  • SCA score: 84
  • Altitude: 1700 m
  • Process: wet
  • Roast level: medium / 3
  • Tasting notes: tamarind, oranges, milk chocolate
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

“The subtle balance of flavours is simply irresistible. Most importantly, there’s no doubt in my mind as to whether this coffee deserves the title of one of the world’s best coffee varieties!”

Coffee made from these limited-edition beans can’t be confused with anything else. The sweet aroma of oranges and milk chocolate tickles the nose, while the palate is cloaked with the thick, sweet taste of milk chocolate. If you close your eyes, without knowing what it is that you’re drinking, you might think that it’s sweetened coffee with a splash of milk. The reality is that there’s no added sugar or milk in the Blue Mountain coffee. By the way, the packaging indicates that the drink should contain notes of tamarind. If you haven’t tried this fruit before, try and detect the piquant smell of burnt sugar in the aroma of this coffee!

The “Jamaica Blue Mountain” coffee is supplied by the “Clydesdale Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee” company, which is run by the Sharp family. Four generations of this family have been growing coffee in the oldest coffee region of the Jamaican Blue Mountains — it’s called Clydesdale and is located in the very heart of the mountains. The goal of this family is not only to maintain the remarkable taste and high quality of their coffee, but also to support the people who help them grow it. 

The quality of Jamaican coffee is closely monitored at the state level. The Coffee Industry Board (CIB), which was established in 1953, carefully examines the coffee and guarantees that it’s 100% Jamaican Blue Mountain by issuing a special CIB seal. The supply of this coffee is extremely low, so it belongs to the LIMITED EDITION line. 

Taste test 26: Coffee beans “Indonesia Kopi Luwak” 

Coffee beans “Indonesia Kopi Luwak” 

  • Country of origin: Indonesia, Central Java
  • Ingredients: Typica beans, single-origin
  • Altitude: 1500 m
  • Process: Luwak
  • Roast level: medium dark / 4
  • Tasting notes: caramel, hazelnuts, chocolate
  • Quantity/packaging: 250 g, convenient zipper

There’s a unique phenomenon related to this coffee: even if people don’t know its exact name, most of them have still heard that it’s referred to as the world’s most expensive coffee. The value of these beans comes from their unique processing method. The Indonesian forests are populated by Asian palm civets, whose favourite delicacies are sweet cherries growing on coffee trees. These animals are expert at picking out only the ripest berries. The pulp of these cherries is subsequently digested, while the pit is eliminated through the gastrointestinal tract. While the pit isn’t digested, the enzymes found in the stomachs of palm civets still have an impact on it. The result is coffee that loses the aggressive bitterness characteristic of Indonesian varieties. By the way, the final taste of such coffee is also affected by other food that the animal has recently eaten. Because of this, each cup of the Kopi Luwak coffee is absolutely unique. 

As you drink this coffee, the intense aroma of chocolate and nuts tickles the nose. Delicate citrusy acidity and the flavour of sweet toasted caramel are unveiled in the coffee as it cools slowly. Thanks to its thickness, you’ll feel like you’re tasting hot chocolate! The supply of this coffee is extremely low, so it belongs to the LIMITED EDITION line. 

Culmination of the case

So, how can you choose the best coffee beans for you? The easiest and best way to do that is simply taste them. The more coffee varieties you try, the clearer it’ll be which coffee beans are best suited for your individual taste. However, it’s extremely important to avoid ruining the beans! If you purchase high-quality beans, yet grind them all at once and store them for a period of time that exceeds the one recommended by the roaster, their quality will quite literally vanish into thin air. It’s important to pay attention to the roasters’ recommendations. For example, if a drip coffee maker is recommended for your coffee, but you prepare it in a coffee machine, its flavour can drastically change. We hope that all of the keywords discussed in this article (single-origin/coffee blend, coffee region, altitude, coffee bean species, processing method, tasting notes, quality score, brewing methods) will also help you to navigate the world of coffee more comfortably. 

Relax! You don’t have to be a professional barista (this is how experts of coffee preparation are called) to prepare a truly great cup of coffee at home. Our advice is this: try and “tame” coffee beans. Taste numerous varieties and avoid using additional ingredients, such as milk and sugar. It’s no secret that when tasting the coffee varieties discussed above, we’ve used up exactly 0 grams of sugar and 0 ml of milk! Experience the natural sweetness of coffee. Discover the distribution of flavours, different kinds of acidity, the interesting balance of different tastes. Also, don’t forget that each coffee variety has a unique story, which transports us to the native country of the beans. Hear that story out. After all, coffee is much more than just a drink that helps you wake up in the morning. 

Oh, we’ve almost forgotten to mention one of the greatest coffee fallacies: it’s the belief that high-quality coffee is always more expensive. Sure, the price of coffee depends on numerous factors, the most notable of which is the rarity of the coffee. It’s only natural that the rarer the coffee is i.e. the lower its global supply the higher its price will be. Does that mean that the rarest coffee is also the best? Definitely not. The most important and, in fact, the only judge of coffee is your personal taste. Trust your taste. And keep on educating it!